490 - Politika | Ministria e Puneve te Jashtme

British Ambassador to Kosovo

 

Diplomacy is increasingly operating in a changed world.

It is a world where, as Foreign Secretary William Hague has underlined, relations between states are no longer monopolised by Foreign Secretaries or Prime Ministers. There is now a mass of connections between individuals, civil society, businesses, pressure groups and charitable organisations which also form part of the relations between nations, and which are being rapidly accelerated by the internet.

Digital footprint of Kosovo’s Digital Diplomacy

The out-degree parameter, which indicates the amount of ministries with whom one ministry has contact, is of paramount importance in this network as the higher a ministry’s out-degree
score, the greater its ability to disseminate information throughout the network. 

Kosovo ranks high in this field due to explosion of Twitter usage by the Ministers of Kosovo government. The country with the highest out-degree is Iceland followed by Sweden, Israel,
Norway, Russia, Poland, Kosovo, Bulgaria, Brazil and Peru. (from a study by Ilan Manor, Twiplomacy) 
 

Nate Tabak

Kosovo can’t get recognition from the UN, but it can get it from Facebook Kosovo’s capital still doesn’t have running water 24 hours a day, but you can get a great beer thanks to the Sabaja Craft Brewery. The microbrewery opened up in Pristina, Kosovo’s capital, last year. It brews American-style ales, including a delicious IPA. “It’s the only beer of its kind in Kosovo,” according to Alex Butler, a New Yorker who owns the brewery with his partner, Etida Zeka. Selling beer in Kosovo isn’t easy: The country ranks near the bottom of Europe in terms of economics and per-capita alcohol consumption. But Sabaja is managing to make it work. The brewery leans heavily on Facebook to promote itself, which got a lot easier in 2013 when the social networking giant effectively recognized Kosovo as a country. ...

Ambassador Adam Ereli

Former Leader of US Public Diplomacy at State Department   Kosovo’s Foreign Ministry is on the cutting-edge of public diplomacy.  As this ground-breaking publication details, its digitallysavy diplomats have successfully married social media and communications with people-to-people exchanges and thought leadership to strengthen alliances and demonstrate that emerging democracies can provide the political and social space for diversity of thought, belief and expression.  As a former leader of America’s public diplomacy apparatus, I commend the authors for their innovative and far-sighted use of soft power to advance our common interests.  Petrit Selimi, Kosovo’s Deputy Foreign Minister in charge of the country’s public diplomacy program, represents one of Europe’s brightest young public diplomacy pioneers. As a keen observer of history and a child of the digital age, Mr. Selimi understands the ineffable yet ineluctable link between communication, public ...

Ambassador Ian Cliff

British Ambassador to Kosovo   Diplomacy is increasingly operating in a changed world. It is a world where, as Foreign Secretary William Hague has underlined, relations between states are no longer monopolised by Foreign Secretaries or Prime Ministers. There is now a mass of connections between individuals, civil society, businesses, pressure groups and charitable organisations which also form part of the relations between nations, and which are being rapidly accelerated by the internet.

Rüdiger Lentz

Executive Director Aspen Institute Germany   We have enjoyed working with Kosovo’s Foreign Ministry in our program for the Western Balkans. The Aspen Institute Germany encourages all Western Balkan Foreign Services to continue working with leading European think-tanks and NGOs to ensure that their voice is heard in the Euro-Atlantic security and economic debate. 

Others About Us

The New York Times PARIS — Ever since little Kosovo proclaimed itself an independent state five years ago, it has failed to win all the recognition it so craves. Neither the United Nations, which confers legitimacy, nor all the European Union, whose members are divided on the question, much less Serbia, from which Kosovo broke away, recognize the birth of a new European nation. But after a campaign waged by an army of devoted Kosovars and strategically placed allies, Kosovo is hailing a grant of legitimacy by a new arbiter of national identity: Facebook. Last month, Kosovo declared victory, after its officials said Facebook approved a number of changes, including giving users registering from the diamond-shaped area on the Balkan Peninsula the option to identify themselves as citizens of Kosovo, rather than the decidedly less attractive option for many there, Serbia. They can also use the Facebook function that allows ...

GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY

Progressive Nation Building in the Age of Digital Diplomacy   Digital Diplomacy is not just about “communications” and broadcasting messages. It is about countries and nonstate actors using digital platforms to achieve strategic policy goals by building relationships and creating communities. With the creation of these communities, governments are directly engaging the public on critical policy issues, benefiting both diplomats and citizens alike. In a digital world the size of your country matters less than the impact of your digital engagement. This panel will explore what’s working, what’s not, and lessons learned. 

Jeffrey Marlow

Pushing the Boundaries of Digital Diplomacy in Kosovo GOOGLE “KOSOVO”, AND Petrit Selimi knows exactly what you’re going to see: dry, diplo-speak scouting reports at best, and depressing references to past conflicts at worst. It’s not exactly the promotional buzz a fledgling country with sights set on global integration would hope for*. ToSelimi, Kosovo’s Deputy Foreign Secretary and a pioneer in Digital Diplomacy, this is a major problem. “Things on Google were all bad,” Selimi notes, “but Kosovo has moved way beyond this in terms of nation building.” Two glaring issues of the country’s internet presence were the nature of the content and a general lack of material with which to counter decade-old news pieces. To start the digital offensive, Selimi initiated “Wikipedia camps”, at which teenagers would learn the basics of researching and ...

BBC Trending

Facebook recognises Kosovo as a region Kosovo has had the ultimate status update on Facebook - it has been recognised as a distinct region by the social network, after a sustained campaign by thousands of volunteer “digital diplomats”. Kosovo declared its independence in 2008, and has since been recognised by some European countries and the US. But until the recent change, an estimated 200,000 Kosovan Facebook users had to register as citizens of Serbia. The tiny territory has not been recognised by around half of the the world’s nations, including vetowielding UN Security Council member Russia. Petrit Selimi, a deputy minister in Kosovo’s Foreign Affairs Ministry, says he is “ecstatic” over Facebook’s move. It represents the culmination of “a major part of the diplomatic efforts of a young republic”, he says. Selimi, a prolific Tweeter who regularly has heated discussions ...